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Tuesday, November 24, 2020 | History

1 edition of Insect-caused damage to the 1956 Douglas-fir cone crop in California found in the catalog.

Insect-caused damage to the 1956 Douglas-fir cone crop in California

Robert E. Stevens

Insect-caused damage to the 1956 Douglas-fir cone crop in California

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Published by California Forest and Range Experiment Station in Berkeley, Calif .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir,
  • Diseases and pests

  • Edition Notes

    StatementRobert E. Stevens
    SeriesResearch note / California Forest and Range Experiment Station -- no. 120, Research note (California Forest and Range Experiment Station) -- no. 120.
    ContributionsCalifornia Forest and Range Experiment Station
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 p. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25577925M
    OCLC/WorldCa608702974

    The Economic Impacts of Bird and Rodent Damage to California Crops: A Methodology to Select Counties for Input-Output Modeling Stephanie A. Shwiff, Katy N. Kirkpatrick, Ray T. Sterner, and Karen Gebhardt USDA APHIS Wildlife Services, National Wildlife Research Center, Fort Collins, Colorado.   Wildfires in Southern California have caused crop damage, the loss of farm structures and business interruptions. The agri business losses are . Douglas fir seeds provide food for a number of small mammals, including chipmunks, mice, shrews, and red squirrels. Bears eat the sap of these trees. Bears eat the sap of these trees. Many songbirds eat the seeds right out of the cone, and raptors, like northern spotted owls, . Protecting Crops from Bird Damage—Blackbirds, gulls, geese, and other birds cause severe damage to sunfl ower, rice, corn, winter wheat, fruit, nut, and other agricultural crops throughout the United States. Based on data collected in 7 major fruit-producing States, NASS estimated wildlife damage to apples, blueberries, and grapes exceeded $


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Insect-caused damage to the 1956 Douglas-fir cone crop in California by Robert E. Stevens Download PDF EPUB FB2

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio An illustration of a " floppy disk. Insect-caused damage to the Douglas-fir cone crop in California Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item.

Insect-caused damage to the Douglas-fir cone crop in California by Robert E. Stevens,California Forest and Range Experiment Station edition, in English. Insect-caused damage to the Douglas-fir cone crop in California by Robert E. Stevens, unknown edition.

Download the for Insect-caused damage to the Douglas-fir cone crop in California; Books for people who don't read print. The Internet Archive is proud to be distributing over 1 million books free in a format called DAISY, designed for those of us who find it challenging to use regular printed media.

There are two types of DAISYs on Open Library: open and protected/10(). Reviews information on sampling and control methods and on four insects that regularly destroy large quantities of seed (Barbara colfaxiana, Dioryctria abietella, Megastigmus spermotrophus, Contarinia oregonensis).

A research programme is suggested, and tabulated data are appended on (1) known or suspected destroyers of Douglas Fir cones or seeds, (2) insects found in cones, whose role is Cited by: 2.

Insect damage to the crop of Douglas-fir and sugar pine cones and seeds in northern California. Related Titles.

Series: Miscellaneous paper (California Forest and Range Experiment Station) ; no. Hall, Ralph C. (Ralph Corbin), Type. Book Material. Published material. Publication info. Insect damage to the crop of Douglas-fir and sugar pine cones and seeds in northern California / By.

Hall, Ralph C. (Ralph Corbin), If you are generating a PDF of a journal article or book chapter, please feel free to enter the title and author information.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Insect damage to the crop of Douglas-fir and sugar pine cones and seeds in northern California Item Preview remove-circle Insect damage to the crop of Douglas-fir and sugar pine cones and seeds in northern California by Hall, Ralph C.

(Ralph. infestations by the Douglas-fir beetle, g. paeudotsugae (Hopk.) was UP­ ward in northwestern Calltornia. The red turpentine beetle, g. Lee., was unusually abundant in associa Id th other bark beetles which had attacked and killed ponderosa and sugar pines, and several species. Relation between cone production and diameter increment of Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco.), Grand Fir [Abies grandis (Dougl.) Lindl.), and Western White pine (Pinus monticola Dougl.) Seed crops of forest trees in the pine region of California.

Relationship between cone crop size and cone damage by insects in. Insect-Caused Damage to the Douglas-Fir Cone Crop in California: Hopkins, Walt Watershed Management Considerations for Sanitation-Salvage Logging in Southern California: Stevens, Robert E.

Ethylene Dibromide Emulsion Spray for Control of the Mountain Pine Beetle in Lodgepole Pine:   A cycle for Douglas-fir cone production is typically 5 to 7 years long.

Once every 5 to 7 years, Douglas-firs produce a heavy crop of cones. On the in-between years, Douglas-firs produce a far lighter crop or even no cones at all. Last year, inas far as I could tell there were no new cones on Douglas-firs whatsoever (at least where I live). Six-Year Plot Study on Douglas-Fir Cone Insect Population œ1uctuations BY A.

HEDLIN Abstract. From to records were obtained on cone production, insect-caused damage to cones, and cone-in•ect populations in four plots of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

Cone crops and insect popu. A midge, Contarinia oregonensis, is one of a number of species of insects which causc seed losses in Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco. In recent years it has been reported causing more damage than any other single species of Douglas-fir cone insect in western Washington (Johnson and Heikkkenen.

Douglas-fir beetles prefer weakened or recently downed trees. You can reduce the damage by keeping tree vigor strong and Douglas-fir blowdown to less than four inch diameter (or larger) Douglas-fir trees per acre. The Douglas-fir beetle is most often found following extensive blowdown of mature trees.

Pests [PDF] Fruittree Leafroller on Ornamental and Fruit Trees, UC IPM [PDF] Ferrisia gilli: A Mealybug Pest of Pistachios and Other Decidious Crops, David Haviland, Robert Beede, Kris Godfrey, Kent Daane Goals for reducing insect and mite damage in home orchards are to: Protect trees and crops from substantial damage; Make it simple and easy.

From to records were obtained on cone production, insect-caused damage to cones, and cone-insect populations in four plots of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Cone crops and insect populations varied extremely.

oregonensis, the Douglas-fir cone gall midge. This insect is a major destroyer of Douglas-fir seeds. It probably occurs throughout most of the range of the host, but is more abundant and a more serious pest in the wet coastal than in drier interior areas.

(Beissn.) Franco and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco var. menziesii). Uses Ethnobotanic: Douglas-fir needles were made into a tea and drank by Isleta Puebloans in New Mexico to cure rheumatism. Douglas-fir resin was used by the Shasta in northern California to poultice cuts and the Yuki along the California coast used a decoction.

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The Douglas-fir beetle is the most damaging insect and often attacks fire-killed or fire-weakened trees. Tussock moths and spruce budworm attack trees of all ages and often cause defoliation.

Several species of insects are capable of reducing the seed crop but are not generally a. Douglas-fir trees are the most common victims of browning or dieback caused by weather-related stress, sometimes in combination with pests and diseases, said Glenn Ahrens, a.

California Fire Weather Severity in Chandler, Craig C. "Light Burning" in Southern California Fuels Stevens, Robert E. Insect-Caused Damage to the Douglas-Fir Cone Crop in California Hopkins, Walt.

Douglas fir grows tall and straight. In fact, it is the tallest conifer in the Northwest, growing to over feet (90 meters). Only redwoods in California grow to a greater height. Douglas fir is also the most common and widely distributed species in the Pacific Northwest.

Any conifer you see west of the Cascade summit in Oregon or Washington. This guide synthesizes the most current information available on the pests and environmental conditions that can damage California’s conifers, the vast majority of native trees in the state.

Authoritative and easy-to-use, it is an essential reference for biologists, arborists, ecologists, foresters and everyone who needs up-to-date information on conifer pests in one convenient manual.o. heavy seed crop can be expected every 5 to 7 years. During this period, there usually is at least 1 crop failure.

Adaptation and Distribution Douglas-fir needs excellent drainage. In the higher elevations of the West that receive snow and in the lower foothills that have moderately cold winters and hot summers, Douglas-fir requires moderate summer.

Douglas-fir is the name of an entire genus of trees that contains six species--two native to North America and four native to eastern Asia. Because of its similarity to other genera, Douglas-fir has given botanists fits.

It has, at various times, been called a pine, a spruce, a hemlock, and a true fir. Insect - Insect - Damage to growing crops: Insects are responsible for two major kinds of damage to growing crops. First is direct injury done to the plant by the feeding insect, which eats leaves or burrows in stems, fruit, or roots.

There are hundreds of pest species of this type, both in larvae and adults, among orthopterans, homopterans, heteropterans, coleopterans, lepidopterans, and. The mortality of red pine cones was studied for several consecutive years using life tables in eight different stands in the northern Great Lakes States.

Usually less than 20% of a cohort of female flowers survived to maturity. Insects were the main source of mortality and were primarily responsible for annual fluctuations in the abundance of mature cones.

In the Blue Mountains of Oregon in53% of U.S. Forest Service land had "visible insect-caused defoliation and mortality," with western spruce budworm causing injury and mortality on 41% of the land.

Douglas-fir beetle, wood borers, Douglas-fir tussock moth, and spruce budworm have increased as a result of fire suppression [5,]. university of california press berkeley and los angeles university of california press, ltd.

london, england isbn library of congress catalog card number: 0 by the regents of the university of california printed by offset in the united states of america. pest of Douglas-fir cones in Montana (Dewey ).

Entire cone crops can be destroyed. Ground spraying techniques have been developed to protect Douglas-fir seed against this insect.

Demonstrations have shown that ground spraying with carbaryl or acephate can double seed yield (Stipe and Green ; Stipe ). Interior Douglas-fir Interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) is one of British ColumbiaÕs largest tree species, growing to 42 m in height.

Its needles are of equal length (approximately cm long), and are flat, soft, narrow, and only slightly sharp. These needles stand out from three sides of a twig. The buds are sharply pointed.

Seed. California Insects ( Found) Listing of bugs and other insects that can be found in California. Note: Please note that insects do not adhere to man-drawn borders on a map and as such they may be found beyond their listed 'reach' showcased on our website.

Text: Nidhi Nath Srinivas, ET Bureau Herbivorous insects destroy one-fifth of the world's total crop production annually.

ET Magazine looks at the 10 most deadly bugs and the pesticide industry they sustain. 10 most deadly bugs that destroy crop production. Douglas -fir A number of beetles attack stressed Douglas-fir, but significant tree mortality due to these beetles is uncommon in California. The Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus psuedotsugae, is most likely to kill trees after its populations have built-up in windthrown timber or trees damaged by.

Growth and Cone Production of Knobcone Pine Under Interrupted Nights: Philpot, Charles W. The Moisture Content of Ponderosa Pine and Whiteleaf Manzanita Foliage in the Central Sierra Nevada: Demars, Clarence J. Predicting Insect-Caused Damage to Douglas-Fir Seed from Samples of Young Cones: Folkman, William S.

Hall, Ralph C. (Ralph Corbin), creator text book Berkeley, Calif.: California Forest and Range Experiment Station, [] print English Caption title. northern Washington) Douglas-fir is preferred; in the central area (south-ern Washington, Oregon, and Idaho), Douglas-fir, white fir, and grand fir are all equally acceptable.

In the south (California, Nevada, Arizona, and Figure 1. -- Distrubution of host type where Douglas-fir tussock moth may be found and location of outbreaks. They infest Douglas fir trees as their name implies. In the United States they can be found on the West coast and Rocky Mountains and in British Columbia.

Poor sites, drought, nutritional deficiencies, heavy cone crop all contribute to infestations. They extrude resinous exudations between scales and cones may be misshapen (distored), with.

The data collected during field assessments were used to develop both an updated distribution map via heads-up digitizing and a vegetation classification to better define bigcone Douglas-fir stands for the area.

To learn more about the project and see survey findings, patterns, and recommendations, see Fremontia Vol. 45, NOS 1 and 2, page Subjects: (George Lincoln), Abies Cactaceae Cactus Coniferae Conifers Correspondence Engelmann, George, Fagaceae Fir Goodale, George L Letters Oak Pinaceae Pine Pinus Quercus Scientific Expeditions United States Vasey, George, Ward, Lester Frank.Infesting Douglas fir trees in the United States they can be found on the West coast and Rocky Mountains and in British Columbia.

Poor sites, drought, nutritional deficiencies, heavy cone crop all contribute to infestations. They extrude resinous exudations between scales and cones may be misshapen (distored), with frass on the surface.